DUMMY FOALS:

HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY

  • Hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the oxygen levels in the horses body 12-15 times the normal amount.
  • The increased pressure causes the oxygen to dissolve into the plasma, which allows it to diffuse into the tissue better.
  • This elevated oxygen saturation stimulates the turnover of cells, increases blood supply, kills bacteria, enhances the effects of antibiotics, reduces swelling, salvages damaged tissue and bone, stimulates collagen production and improves skin growth.

REPRODUCTIVE PROBLEMS:

HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY

  • Hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the oxygen levels in the horses body 12-15 times the normal amount.
  • The increased pressure causes the oxygen to dissolve into the plasma, which allows it to diffuse into the tissue better.
  • This elevated oxygen saturation stimulates the turnover of cells, increases blood supply, kills bacteria, enhances the effects of antibiotics, reduces swelling, salvages damaged tissue and bone, stimulates collagen production and improves skin growth.
  • Inhibits  the inflammatory response for better uterine tone.
  • Helps mare’s clear retained uterine fluid.
  • Increases libido

SOLARIUMS-INFRA-RED LIGHT THERAPY

  • For Mares—higher production of vitamin D, which has a sustainable influence on the calcium/phosphorus metabolism and strengthens the foals bone structure and formation
  • Better blood supply to the mare and foal
  • Helps mares return to normal cycling quicker
  • For Stallions—increased performance due to increased hormonal levels in testicles and increased production of sperm

BREEDING DIFFICULT MARES:

HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY & ITS USES IN

The patient is a fourteen year-old Quarter Horse mare who has been barren for four years. Dr. Fred Benker, with Equine Medical Center of Ocala was called to do a reproduction exam on the mare and handle the breeding. Upon doing the first exam January 22, 2009 the mare presented with 4+ fluid in her uterus and her cervix was stenotic (tight). She cu ltured with klebsiella and a 4+ cytology. The mare was lavaged on January 23rd and 24th. From January 26th to the 30th, she was lavaged four additional times and infused with the antibiotic Timentin. Oxitocin was administered three times daily throughout the heat cycle. On the 28th, 29th and 30th of January, she was also treated in the hyperbaric chamber at a depth of 2.5 ATA for 45 minutes.

She was checked again on February 17th, with the ultrasound showing no fluid in her uterus. On February 20th a culture and cytology was performed. The culture showed no growth and the cytology was normal.

On February 24th an ultrasound showed a “CL” (corpus luteum) was present and prostin was administered to bring the mare back into heat. On March 2nd, a 39mm follicle was present and deslorelin, used to help promote ovulation, was administered. She was inseminated with cooled shipped semen on March 3rd. An ultrasound done on March 4th showed the mare had ovulated, and Dr. Benker lavaged and treated her with Timentin. The mare was pregnancy checked on March 18th and was pronounced “IN FOAL” 15 days. A recheck on March 31st showed a heartbeat.

Dr. Benker stated that “normally you don’t get such good results treating a klebsiella bacterial infection with just one series of treatments. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy, in conjunction with the veterinarian treatments and antibiotics, was instrumental in cleaning up this mare and allowing her to get pregnant”.

Special thanks to Dr. Fred Benker and Equine Medical Center of Ocala for allowing us to present this case study.